Monday, September 4, 2017

If Only There Was a Video of Medford BLM Publicly Admitting They Want to Steal the Sugar Pine Mine Stamp Mill...Oh, Look! There Is One!

The following video is an Archaeologist from BLM Medford District PUBLICLY ADMITTING their plans for the Sugar Pine Mine - 6 YEARS AGO.

The video, shot by Oregon Mining Historian, Kerby Jackson, at the Grants Pass Interagency Office on 4th October, 2011 records an exchange between Jackson and the AML Unit Archaeologist (who shall remain nameless for now, since they will try and have us charged with Reckless Endangerment for telling the truth about one of their lying, thieving Indiana Jones wannabes.

Contrary to what BLM told the public during what they dubbed The Sugar Pine Incident - that they didn't even know there was a mine there - they have been planning to place the Sugar Pine Mine (and other mines in the same group,) on the National Register of Historic Places.  The plan, we have discovered, through gleaning various documents procured via FOIA request, was to shut down the mines and take the old, rare Jardine Stamp Mill that sits on one of them.

Subsequently, when the trespassing antiquity-thieves didn't get their way, they filed false police reports about being "held up at gunpoint"by the mine's caretaker, and proceeded to terrorize him for weeks, urging him to give up the dirt on Sugar Pine or else there's a Grand Jury waiting for you.

Needless to say, this video is just one piece of evidence that proves the vast BLM conspiracy against the Sugar Pine Mine, that dates back several years - since at least 2009 when the BLM Medford began snooping around in Galice, looking for Cultural Resources to steal - an excellent excuse to use 43 CFR 3809 (UUD) regulations to slip in by stealth through the back-door with ARPA and NEPA, and shut down mines - despite the lies he tells in the video, emphasizing that there will be no mines shut down, no mining interfered with...and all said with a straight face. Unfortunately for them, their consistently sloppy, lazy, inadequate research failed to uncover that the mine was Pre-1955 - removing it from their Surface Management authority. But they probably just didn't care. 

A BLM Medford Public Information Officer, who disgraced himself in public with his overwrought ramblings about the gargantuan size of the Sugar Pine Mine, told the public the BLM didn't even know that there was a mine there.  Curious, since they've had a Monitoring Project on our Stamp Mill for some time now, funded by the Oregon State Historic Preservation Office (SHPO), currently trying to extort us for a ridiculous sum of money for information about our own mine - because they don't want to hand it over.  Because SHPO are in it up to their necks and they don't want to lose their pensions or go to jail.

Unfortunately for Medford BLM, the coveted Stamp Mill is a conveyed item of personal property and cannot be taken from the owners by any law that exists in this country.  And the Surface Rights issue is absolutely moot in relation to the Stamp Mill.  As is whatever decision the Department of the Interior's own Administrative Court, IBLA makes - it cannot change the fact that the Stamp Mill is beyond the reach of BLM.  Forever.  It's a pity though - if they'd asked for it we would have given it to them.  

The answers he gives to the questions asked are absolutely priceless and showcases beautifully what BLM think of the general public, and that they will do what they want to whomever they want whenever they want.  The contempt and arrogance of this Agency-Supremacist shines through.


TRANSCRIPT OF BLM AML UNIT PRESENTATION

HOLES IN THE HILLS : THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF
ABANDONED MINES IN SOUTHERN OREGON

RECORDED 4TH OCTOBER, 2011

[ Transcription ends at 17:47 ]

BLM Archaeologist : I'll come back to this plurality of names in just a second, but in terms of 'feature cannibalism' this particular stamp mill is one of my favorites that we've found, and it shows you the ingenuity of mining, and miners, and basically shows you all of these principals we've talked about. You've got a stamp mill that we have historical documentation that this exact stamp mill was set up and in use by 1925. But it was not set up here, at this spot. I know that because the tie-down bolts on the mortar block here – the mortar block is new concrete – and somebody stuck rebar in there to hold it up, 'cause it's pretty crazy, rather than actual tie rods.

George Backes : [whispered] Sugar Pine Mine.

BLM Archaeologist : We don't know exactly where this was set up originally, I have a feeling that behind this where somebody had taken a D8 Cat and they've made a nice area for them to come up and be able to load their ore in the mill, that probably was where the stamp mill was set at. We know its been moved, but it is a 1925 stamp mill. Obviously, this Toyota pick-up truck is not 1925. This is actually the motor that was driving the bull wheel on the stamp mill – it's a 1971, uh, or not a Toyota – it's a Datsun. 1971 Datsun truck that somebody had set up to run this thing. You've got a 1976 bed of a Toyota pick-up that actually is their ore chute that allows them to drop ore in there. There's the bed of a Ford pick-up that off the picture. The Ford pick-up was the ore bin, and you've got a lot of old timbers and different things that indicate that they've reused things that they've found on-site. That's typical of what you're gonna find at a mine here. The lady in the back of the room.

Lady in Back of the Room : [inaudible]

George Backes : Two-stamp?

Kerby Jackson : It's five.

George Backes : Two stamp. That mill is a two-stamp. Wanna bet money?

Kerby Jackson : I have photos of it at home.

George Backes : Wanna bet? It's a two-stamp. Looked at it a dozen times.

Woman in Back of the Room : [inaudible] … I don't know if it's a congress, or Presidential Executive Order... [inaudible] ...It's a National Historical Preservation Act... [inaudible] which established [inaudible]

George Backes : [inaudible] ...little Datsun motor and a transmission, still had the front end of the Datsun pick-up on the front of it. The two-stamp – one of the stamps is busted. [inaudible]

Kerby Jackson : I do remember that.

Woman in Back of the Room : [inaudible] ...be identified as archaeological sites – I guess what I'm trying to figure out [inaudible] ...I don't get the connection why they're even going through this process, whoever they are.

BLM Archaeologist : Sure, that's a – let me clarify that – that's my fault; I didn't make it clear enough for you. Everything we're going to is not an archaeological site. That's something to keep [inaudible]. We're talking about archaeological sites. The stuff I'm showing you [inaudible]. But some of these, like the, the, the shot earlier with the Environmental Impact, the trailer and two cars – that is not an archaeological site, it's – that's a mine. And it's, it's, it's a dump. Uh, and so it doesn't fit the definition. There is a definition given, uh, for what an archaeological site is by the State Historic Preservation Office. Uh, uh, and their definitions in the Historic Preservation Act what constitutes a historical site, which we were mentioning. All this stuff's online. I encourage you to read it. It doesn't take long to read through.

Woman in the Back of the Room : Will they give a definition of why they're [inaudible] ...archaeological site. Uh, there's a reason for this, right?

BLM Archaeologist : Yes, and if you read the National Historic Preservation Act it will explain the whole purpose of it. And it's not just the NHPA – there's, uh, uh – oh, trying to think what it was – the 1906 Antiquities – the 1906 Antiquities Protection Act. Uh, there's a whole body of law that goes through and talks about things that are important for cultural heritage – our history – and why they should be preserved. And so, uh, you know I'm not gonna take – we're running out of time – I'm not gonna take time to describe these laws now. You can see them for yourself – every single one of them is online. Uh, if you go to the National Parks Service, uh, just look up “archaeology laws,” uh, National Parks Service. They've actually got a really nice website with links to all the original legislation in PDF format. Go and download it and read it through.

2nd BLM Archaeologist : One more thing – I suggest you go to the State Historic Preservation Office website. They have a lot of good things on there.

BLM Archaeologist : Yeah; Oregon SHPO. S – H – P – O. Yes, sir?

Man in Audience : Yeah, you forgot to list the outhouse that's on that site.

BLM Archaeologist : [laughs] Yeah, that's right. I did. I think I did mention, yeah – two support buildings [inaudible] Yes, sir?

Kerby Jackson : In the case of this one – is this going to be an “Archaeological Site?”

BLM Archaeologist : It is, yes. Because it is, it's, it has, on this particular mine...

Kerby Jackson : It does definitely have history.

BLM Archaeologist : Located in 1900. Yeah, you know what I'm talking about.

Kerby Jackson : It was actually located before 1900. That's actually the oldest listed lode mine in this district. And I also know that the claim that's current actually has an unbroken Chain of Title, since 1860.

BLM Archaeologist : [inaudible]. I'm talking to the assessment miner.

Kerby Jackson : You've actually talked to the miner?

BLM Archaeologist : Not the guy who has the claim. I've talked to his assessment miner who had come down from the [inaudible].

Kerby Jackson : Needless to say where there's, in that situation, uh, will that stop mining on that claim?

BLM Archaeologist : No. We can't emphasize enough what we're doing is not going to stop people from mining, so, you know, we're looking at it strictly from the standpoint of doing, uh, what's called the Section 106 National Historic Preservation Act. Uh, BLM's got a project where they're looking to, uh, uh, identify any abandoned mines, and if they are abandoned and there's a [inaudible] ...definition for that, which 2nd BLM Archaeologist mentioned, uh, and the hazards, like you've got a vertical shaft, you know, hundreds of feet deep and there's nobody working it, there's no claims on it, uh, BLM is identifying those and determining, or if that needs to be closed. According to national laws, BLM cannot do that – close that up – without going through a process and things, such as determining, is this of historical significance, and is closing this mine going to to have a detrimental effect on the historical significance of this site?

Kerby Jackson : Right.

BLM Archaeologist : That's what we're doing. Yeah. What we're doing's not gonna stop anybody from mining.

Kerby Jackson : I, I, I guess my biggest question is – do you have the realization with this particular claim in question – I know which one; I've been by it several times – uh, there is an unbroken Chain of Title that goes back before the mill was even there?

BLM Archaeologist : Yes.

Kerby Jackson : So, that mill, through an unbroken Chain of Title – it belongs to the claim owner. Have you considered that?

BLM Archaeologist : It's – yeah – I've thought about it. But you're getting into an area of legal issues, you know, you...

Kerby Jackson : I, I, I guess my question is, is where you want it listed as an archaeological site and obviously a lot of that has to do with basically how intact that mill is – and I think it's about 75% – besides the fact is has been revamped. You know, there's really nothing stopping the miner from using that mill. It's his property. I guess my question is – how does what you guys do affect that?

BLM Archaeologist : Uh, it's a good question. Is, uh, you know, I can't answer it for you. It's, it's, it's gonna turn on legal interpretations and, you know, as 2nd BLM Archaeologist is always fond of pointing out to me, I read something legally, and I say – well, this say this, and he says, well, let me call my lawyer friend and see what they say, and they have something totally different that they say, and you know, it's just a good reminder for me that, yeah, it's something that, that, congress and lawyers and other people are gonna have to figure out. I can't determine that.

Kerby Jackson : OK

BLM Archaeologist : That's – you're pointing out a really good issue, though, and it's, it's, they're, I believe, that you've got a very interesting gray area where you can get archaeology laws and mining laws and you know, uh, you get environmental protection laws – you get all these things that are laws that we and congress, as a country have, the people that we've elected passed them, and it seems like there's some conflicts and that's why you've got the Judicial System.


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